Seoul, Oslo February 22, 2012 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, a global leader in digital media and digital convergence technologies, and International DMB Advancement Group (IDAG) today announced the launch of digital radio, mobile TV and internet services with the Samsung GALAXY S WiFi 5.0. The device will be available from April, 2012 in Germany, the Netherlands, UK, Switzerland, Norway and South Africa.

Samsung and IDAG see big opportunities in an environment where consumers are spending more time on mobile entertainment and news.

- Samsung believes that such functionalities will take GALAXY S WiFi 5.0 to a new level. Built-in DMB/DAB+ provides excellent radio and TV experiences on the go, said Byung Joon Jang, Director of MID Sales & Marketing at Samsung Electronics.
Combining broadcasting and the internet in the same product introduces a range of new possibilities that can strengthen radio and TV programs and widen their appeal among audiences. Digital radio via DAB/DAB+ or Mobile TV via DMB is currently available in more than 40 countries globally, and expects to extend to other countries.
- The functionalities of the Samsung GALAXY S WiFi 5.0 stand out. We expect that Samsungs entry into this area will inspire new fans of digital radio and mobile TV, said Gunnar Garfors, president of IDAG.

European governments are responding positively to the replacement of FM with DMB/DAB+, the de facto standard for digital radio. This creates a huge demand as hundreds of millions of traditional FM radios will be replaced or upgraded to DMB/DAB+ which is a flexible technology, allowing for mobile TV services together with radio.

The GALAXY S WiFi 5.0 will be exhibited with the demonstration of mobile TV and digital radio services at Hall 8, Mobile World Congress 2012.
About Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. is a global leader in semiconductor, telecommunication, digital media and digital convergence technologies with 2011 consolidated sales of US$143.1 billion. Employing approximately 222,000 people in 205 offices across 71 countries, the company operates two separate organizations to coordinate its nine independent business units: Digital Media & Communications, comprising Visual Display, Mobile Communications, Telecommunication Systems, Digital Appliances, IT Solutions, and Digital Imaging; and Device Solutions, consisting of Memory, System LSI and LCD. Recognized for its industry-leading performance across a range of economic, environmental and social criteria, Samsung Electronics was named the worlds most sustainable technology company in the 2011 Dow Jones Sustainability Index. For more info, please visit www.samsung.com. 

Contacts:

South Africa: Benjamin Lambert benjamin.lambert@samsung.com, Ntutule Tshenye ntutule.n@samsung.com; Germany: Petra Woyzik p.woyzik@samsung.com;
Austria: Petra Gregorowitsch g.petra@samsung.com; Switzerland: Mirjam Berger m.berger@samsung.com; The Netherlands: Vivian Peters v.peters@samsung.com;
Great Britain: Rachel Cameron r.cameron@samsung.com, Sally Clift s.clift@samsung.com;
Norway: Erik Johannesson erik.j@samsung.com
About International DMB Advancement Group (IDAG)
IDAG is an organization that promotes, facilitates and coordinates DMB and DAB+ initiatives around the world. The focus is on devices, content and services that explore the combination of broadcasting and the internet. IDAG was founded in 2009 and has contributed to governmental hearings and participated in talks with national and international authorities on frequencies, licenses, services and other issues. The organization has 20 members from 15 countries on 4 continents. More info on: www.theidag.org. Contact: Gunnar Garfors gunnar.garfors@nrk.no, +47 40 00 00 22.
About DMB/DAB+
DMB, DAB and DAB+ are all part of the same standard, Eureka-147, which is the de facto standard for broadcasted digital radio and mobile television on four continents. The technology makes broadcasting of all content types possible, including TV, radio, photos, electronic magazines and instant traffic information. Consumption of content via DMB/DAB+ cost both broadcasters and consumers less than via the internet, and it helps preserve bandwidth for other kinds of web surfing.